Requesting Canadian Naturalization Records
Alan Greenberg - alan.greenberg@mcgill.ca


Naturalizations records can contain a wealth of information and are often the only place that an immigrant's ship arrival information is indexed (ship arrivals in Canada are largely un-indexed). Further information on Canadian naturalizations can be found on the Canadian Genealogy Centre's Natuaralization Search Engine.

Original records for naturalizations prior to 1915 are generally not available, but there is one major exception. Records (but not the applications) for many early Montreal naturalizarions ARE available - see entry on home page under HOW-TO GUIDES AND SEARCH ENGINES

Until the 1920's, if a husband was naturalized, his wife and any children born prior to arrival were also implicitly naturalized. Later, they were naturalized only if they were explicitly listed on the application forms. In either case, a person who was naturalized along with their husband or father could later apply for a Naturalization Certificate with their own name on it (often required for a passport or old-age benefits). When the wife/child applied for their own papers (perhaps many years later), the file for this certificate could have much of the same information as the now-destroyed pre-1915 file.

To request a naturalization file, several conditions must be met:

The request should be made using an Access to Information Request Form. Two formats are available:
Under "Federal Government Institution" fill in:

         Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Public Rights Administration

Include as much information about the person as you can. This should include:
Although it is not mandatory, include the Naturalization Certificate Number and Series (a letter from A-F). Some certificate numbers will also have an "F" suffix meaning the certificate was issued in French. For naturalizations between 1915 and 1936, the series/number can be found on the Canadian Genealogy Centre's web site (see above).

Check the box saying you want copies of the original documents, and the box saying that you are a citizen or resident of Canada.

A non-refundable fee of five Canadian dollars payable to the Receiver General of Canada must be submitted with the request (cheque or money order).

Don't forget to date and sign the form.

The form, proof-of-death and fee should be sent to:
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
Public Rights Administration
360 Laurier Ave West
10th Floor
Ottawa, ON
K1A 1L1